Captured News Media: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia, and Montenegro

Why are independent media that contribute to democracy and economic progress failing to take root or survive in many countries? We at the Center for International Media Assistance suggest that one piece of the answer may be found in a concept known as media capture. Media capture is a systemic governance problem where political leaders and media owners work together in a symbiotic but mutually corrupting relationship: Media owners provide supportive news coverage to political leaders in exchange for favorable government treatment of their businesses and political interests.

Profiles in Media Development Funding

In order to better understand the work donors are facilitating around the world the Center for International Media Assistance, with support from the Open Society Foundations (OSF), surveyed these organizations. In each profile you will learn about the organization’s background, its current thematic priorities, details about funding, and in most cases a couple of examples that illustrate the types of media development projects they fund.

Analyzing the Panama Papers in Baghdad: An Interview with Iraqi Journalist Muntathar Nasser

The unprecedented collaboration of over 400 investigative journalists in more than 80 countries to analyze the 11.5 million files leaked from the database of the fourth-largest offshore law firm in the world, Mossack Fonseca, has been one of the biggest global media stories of the year. Some have argued that this novel, cross-border cooperation, which was coordinated by the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, is the future of investigative journalism. But what is participation like for journalists around the world, and what do they think about the future of such initiatives?

Media in Latin America: A Glass Half Full or Half Empty?

In Chile, the government of President Michelle Bachelet has announced an investment of $100 million U.S. to modernize the country’s public service broadcaster, TVN. This is important because public service broadcasting–often coopted into becoming a state-run broadcaster–is an important channel for quality media in the few countries around the world where it is allowed to function independently

Developing Local Media Systems for Syrian Refugees

Many Syrian refugees are living in an information void. Developing local media systems within refugee camps may be a solution. This work also may have the added benefit of helping to promote a more successful media environment in the region.

ZERO-RATING THE NEWS: HOW WILL SPONSORED DATA INITIATIVES IMPACT ACCESS TO NEWS?

How will sponsored data plans, also known as zero-rating, affect the news people read? This is one of the main questions that will be be discussed at WAN-IFRA's Global Media Policy Forum in Cartagena in June. CIMA Associate Editor Daniel O'Maley will be there to offer his perspective on the global debate.

Ukraine's Media: In some ways, better than you think

Internews's Gillian McCormack on how she was pleasantly surprised by how Ukraine's public service broadcaster handled a ‪Panama Papers‬ story that implicated the country's president.

RUSSIA’S INTERNET CRACKDOWN

As part of Russia’s authoritarian turn following Vladimir Putin’s return to the presidency in May 2012, the Kremlin has launched an unprecedented crackdown on the Russian Internet.

A BOLD INVESTMENT FUND TO CREATE INDEPENDENT MEDIA MARKETS AND FREE INFORMATION IN EASTERN EUROPE

The United States and likeminded countries that advocate liberal democracy have a historic opportunity to establish a robust, long-term media investment fund to stimulate new markets, create new ownership, especially of emerging and new media, and promote innovative technologies.

What is Media Development?

The term “media development” refers to evolution and change in the fields of news media and communications. This evolution can be stimulated by donor support, private investment, or indigenous processes of change led by media owners, managers, journalists, or other players such as media industry associations, or other collective efforts.

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Press Freedom Scores

Montenegro

In Montenegro, business leaders and government pressure independent media. The government tends to play favorites towards certain public media outlets. In addition, right to access is not always respected, especially with regards to government corruption incidents. Check out what the major media freedom indices have to say. (All scores are adjusted to a 0-100 scale).

  • IREX
  • FH
  • RSF